Because nothing raises money like bashing the "competition"

Comments

12 comments posted
Right on

funny thing is that I couldn't find a forum devoted to women's reproductive health issues. I suspect the rather generic privacy allows brave Dems to dance around the a-word.

dblhelix's picture
Posted by dblhelix (not verified) on 7 March 2006 - 6:29pm
Unlike Planned Parenthood

We are not a large organization with a paid staff and an outreach department. The topics at YearlyKos are there because people cared enough about them to form proposals and send them in. I would have loved for someone from Planned Parenthood to contact us.

If someone doesn't like what we're doing, the call for volunteers and proposals went out a long time ago...

If you are mad because your issue is not being covered enough, be mad at yourself. You didn't step up when the opportunity was there.

Regardless, there are plans for dealing with the topic of abortion. But mainly because the already overloaded volunteers are pushing it...with no help from the traditional advocates.

Regardless, all publicity is good. Thanks for Media Girl's post and I hope that someone will step up and help us with this important topic in a way that will reach out to the blogosphere and not condemn it. Important positive things will happen at YK, but it is only what people who care are willing to make of it. We're just ordinary people.

gina's picture
Posted by gina (not verified) on 9 March 2006 - 11:30am
You are hindered by your patron

...who, along with his posse, has made very clear that women's "pet causes" are not welcome in his brand of progressivism.

If this were a progressive political conference, I would imagine you'd have much more robust support and participation. As it is, there's no reason to expect a Kos-branded conference to be any different than the Kos-branded blog enterprise.

Alas....

media girl's picture
Posted by media girl on 9 March 2006 - 12:31pm
and unlike planned parenthood

you'll get no money from me, although i'd enjoy participating in an annual progressive bloggers convention.

but yearlykos isn't an annual progressive bloggers convention. a progessive bloggers convention would be awash in topics of concern to women. the title alone tells a little story. if your organization minimizes women's issues though, lets have no blaming the victim, which is what you seem to be doing when you say "If you are mad because your issue is not being covered enough, be mad at yourself. You didn't step up when the opportunity was there."

medigirl is spot on in her obvious resentment at the party blogs© use of Planned Parenthood as a distraction-pinata that's being whacked much harder than it deserves in an attempt to defect the legitimate anger at Alito's presence on the Supreme Court bench away from the real culprits. It was the failure of the senate democratic leadership, and the democratic senators who voted for cloture, that gave the Republicans the needed assist that put him there. The democratic party made a feeble, half-hearted effort to stop Alito, mostly for show. Bashing NARAL and Planned Parenthood for their "failure" to stop Alito is HOGWASH. Last time I looked neither organization actually has a vote in the senate.

as far as "any publicity is good publicity" thats laughable and simply isn't true.

Any so-called progressive who recommends defunding Planned Parenthood by withholding contributions that were formerly given, make very sure you know what you're really doing. You won't be taking money away from "a large organization with a paid staff and an outreach department" as stated above. You'll be joining Republican Texas State Senators Tommy Williams and Bob Deuell in their efforts to do this:

Why Tanya cried

so, this morning i dragged myself out of bed before dawn to be at planned parenthood at 730 and wait in the freezing morning shade until 9 for my annual exam. at 930, myself and the 25 other women(of color.of course)grumbled in solidarity and confusion, wondering why we were still waiting and shivering. finally an employee opened the doors and coralled us inside just to inform us that there would be no walk-in exams today.or tomorrow.or ever. are you kidding me? i thought. nope.no joke. turns out the good ol boys at the texas state legislature cut pp's funding by 40% last friday. i stood in the office stunned while 3 mothers began to cry. another women, at least 65 years old, turned to me and asked, "que dijo?" what did she say? as i tried to explain what i still didnt understand, i began to feel my anger swell. overnight one of the safest, most reliable, most critical social services vanished. all patients over 24 years old have to seek new clinics, all birth control now costs $25/month, all annuals $125, all pregnancy tests $30. i stood waiting for the chance of one more pack of birth control pills, asking questions answered with shrugs and apologies, watching faces full of exasperation. when my name was called i tried again to get more information, but the fact was clear and simple; accessible family planning and women's reproductive rights are not a priority. i left with a pack of pills after giving all my $35, sat in my car and cried.

bayprairie's picture
Posted by bayprairie on 9 March 2006 - 1:12pm
Not quite Gina

Who the hell said it had to be Planned Parenthood? When the agenda was being formulated several women questioned the noticeable absence of ABORTION.... here is the thread below where you brushed off any attempt to put women on the yKos Agenda

Women's issues (4.00 / 13)

I think the key to addressing women's issues is to stop putting them in a box and labeling them "women's issues." We're half of this country. Women's issues are American issues.

With that, I'd like to see these things integrated as part of how we define progressivism...

Attaining the American Dream

Privacy

Health Care

The Economy

...

There are no women's issues that cannot be defined as issues all Americans should be concerned with. We can't continue defining our issues as something that only affects 50% of America. We're going to continue this backslide if we don't work to get others to understand why these things are important in the larger picture. Plus, I'm tired of being used as a wedge by the conservatives.

Sorry if this comes off as a rant. Don't mean for it to. I'm just tired of being seen as an "also ran" in the battle for progressivism. Its time to integrate ourselves.

YearlyKos

by gina on Thu Jan 05, 2006 at 09:46:08 AM PDT

A few commentors:

...

That's great (none / 0)

But I can see this becoming a convention for the straight, while male, while the concerns of people like me are ignored. As usual.

Buy your copy of the dKos Trollhouse Cookbook, today!

by fabooj on Thu Jan 05, 2006 at 12:42:28 PM PDT

[ Parent ]

...

I appreciate this discussion (none / 0)

Its so hard to talk reasonably about such emotional issues. And when it comes to our rights, its hard to not get emotional about the idea of losing them. Thanks for engaging so beautifully on this topic.

Ya, know...I'm just so damn tired of losing the debate on women's issues.

I take that back, we're not losing the debate. We definitely win the debate. But we are losing hearts and minds. We're back sliding and we need more people on our side. We just can't continue having discussions the same way and expect the fight to take a turn for the better.

Maybe I am wrong. Maybe we should continue accepting all the responsibility for our issues, and we just need more women to pick up the gauntlet. But I want men to feel responsible too. I want them to understand the importance of the values behind our stances. I want them to see that it is in their own best interest to stand with us. I want them to participate in these battles with us. And I think by having a separate panel with a bunch of the usual suspects saying the same things isn't going to do that.

I just feel like we have to accept our situation where it is, and meet half way those who would stand with us, but only if we do the hard work of convincing them they should. And maybe we shouldn't have to convince them. But the reality is that we do.

IDK, hrh. I wish I did. But I'm just so damn tired of losing. We need a new strategy.

YearlyKos

by gina on Thu Jan 05, 2006 at 12:38:44 PM PDT

[ Parent ]

I want men to feel responsible too (none / 0)

but trying to rebrand "women's issues" as "everyone's issues" won't do it.

I'm not sure what you mean by "losing hearts and minds". I don't see that happening.

To my way of thinking, we shouldn't care so much about how others perceive us. We should continue to talk loudly about feminist issues, and continue to hammer on how important they are, even if it pisses some people off. We don't have to suck up to anyone.

Perhaps some mighty victory is growing in you now. - Mike Finley

by hrh on Thu Jan 05, 2006 at 03:14:19 PM PDT

[ Parent ]

we should care about how others perceive us (none / 0)

if we want their votes on our side. That has nothing to do with compromising on issues, and everything to do about being heard.

And instead of talking louder we should talk strategically. We should take the debate to the issues, not isolate ourselves. It takes a village and all. It's not about sucking up. Its about communicating to someone besides the choir. Its about working with our natural allies, and I don't believe men are the enemy. Some are, but so are some women.

We're losing. Abortion is in danger again. There are disproportionally more women than men living in poverty. The religious right is doing their damnedness to keep us barefoot and pregnant.

And we are losing heart's and minds. I'm from the South. I am a teacher. For 12 years I have watched young women become more and more anti-feminist. I do what I can, but I am only one person and I'm not the one framing the message they are hearing. I've taught in different settings, from inner city to, literally, in the middle of a cotton field. We're losing rural and low income women because we're discussing an abstract feminism we've allowed the right to frame because we haven't made significant progress in raising the minimum wage, enforcing child support laws, increasing access to health care, strengthening workplace protections...all issues that effect women more than men. And we need more than women voting with us on these issues if we want to win.

And why shouldn't we take the fight to those issues? Why do we have to stay in our own box separate from everything else? Why are we letting our issues be marginalized by isolating ourselves? It's like we willingly cloister ourselves. Why aren't we opening the door, walking out, stepping onto their turf, and demanding to be heard? I am a woman. I have a stake in healthcare, and I have a stake in a healthy economy and I have a stake in organized labor. And you men? Wake the hell up. Because what hurts us will eventually hurt you too. If you won't join us on principle, then join us for your own self-interest.

We have to move the debate forward because this slow creeping backwards has no good side to it.

My Grandmother-in-law's caretaker is Iranian. She remembers before the revolution when she had rights. If we don't get more people on our side the same could happen to us.

I'm really afraid for our future. That's one reason I give so much to this project. There's still hope in the blogosphere.

YearlyKos

by gina on Thu Jan 05, 2006 at 05:46:36 PM PDT

[ Parent ]

I guess we're talking past each other (none / 0)

because I'm not sure what you're talking about, in concrete terms. I've never said we should isolate ourselves, preach only to the choir, etc. And as for "why aren't we demanding to be heard", I just said in my last post that we should be more aggressive about stating our case and getting our points across.

Maybe I misunderstanding you, so please correct me if I'm wrong - but it sounds like you're trying to avoid "the F word" of feminism and you're reluctant to bring up any discussion of issues that are characterized as "women's issues", or even to view any issues from women's perspectives, e.g., women in the military, because of a fear that this will "cloister" us.

But it's not necessarily true that doing this will put us in a cloister or ghettoize us. There are ways of bringing up these issues without sounding like a bunch of pomo academics at the MLA convention nattering on about "gendered spaces" etc. If that's what you mean by "abstract feminism", then I agree with you - that stuff doesn't help matters.

You said that rightwing framing of feminism is a big problem and is causing young women to say they're "anti-feminist". OK, then I think it behooves us, as committed progressives, to discuss a new framing for feminism. One that includes men, of course (there are plenty of men who are feminists and declare themselves as such). If we women are truly in danger of losing our rights, as you say, then it's imperative that we hold fast to the ideals of feminism, and keep getting in people's faces about them, instead of sighing and saying, "Ah well, you have to go along to get along, so let's just try to integrate our concerns into the big picture."

Perhaps some mighty victory is growing in you now. - Mike Finley

by hrh on Fri Jan 06, 2006 at 08:44:20 AM PDT

[ Parent ]

poor job communicating on my part (none / 0)

the topics listed above are not really the topics as presented, and we should have listed "women's issues" so there would be no misunderstanding. In fact, looking back on this, that was really a dumb mistake.

When I mean not putting in a box, I mean, there will be no panel on, for example, "labor" but labor will be a theme addressed throughout. Same with women's issues.

We'll have sessions labeled "American Dream: A progress report" and "Framing Controversial Issues" and "Workplace Issues" and others.

So what I'm saying is that there will be no panel on women's issues because we intend to spread the exposure around, but women's issues will be addressed by women.

The same is true for religion and minority issues etc.

Again, I really really appreciate this discussion. You have helped me understand where the misperception lies. Thank you.

YearlyKos

by gina on Fri Jan 06, 2006 at 10:55:46 PM PDT

[ Parent ]

....

we should care about how others perceive us (none / 0)

if we want their votes on our side. That has nothing to do with compromising on issues, and everything to do about being heard.

And instead of talking louder we should talk strategically. We should take the debate to the issues, not isolate ourselves. It takes a village and all. It's not about sucking up. Its about communicating to someone besides the choir. Its about working with our natural allies, and I don't believe men are the enemy. Some are, but so are some women.

We're losing. Abortion is in danger again. There are disproportionally more women than men living in poverty. The religious right is doing their damnedness to keep us barefoot and pregnant.

And we are losing heart's and minds. I'm from the South. I am a teacher. For 12 years I have watched young women become more and more anti-feminist. I do what I can, but I am only one person and I'm not the one framing the message they are hearing. I've taught in different settings, from inner city to, literally, in the middle of a cotton field. We're losing rural and low income women because we're discussing an abstract feminism we've allowed the right to frame because we haven't made significant progress in raising the minimum wage, enforcing child support laws, increasing access to health care, strengthening workplace protections...all issues that effect women more than men. And we need more than women voting with us on these issues if we want to win.

And why shouldn't we take the fight to those issues? Why do we have to stay in our own box separate from everything else? Why are we letting our issues be marginalized by isolating ourselves? It's like we willingly cloister ourselves. Why aren't we opening the door, walking out, stepping onto their turf, and demanding to be heard? I am a woman. I have a stake in healthcare, and I have a stake in a healthy economy and I have a stake in organized labor. And you men? Wake the hell up. Because what hurts us will eventually hurt you too. If you won't join us on principle, then join us for your own self-interest.

We have to move the debate forward because this slow creeping backwards has no good side to it.

My Grandmother-in-law's caretaker is Iranian. She remembers before the revolution when she had rights. If we don't get more people on our side the same could happen to us.

I'm really afraid for our future. That's one reason I give so much to this project. There's still hope in the blogosphere.

YearlyKos

by gina on Thu Jan 05, 2006 at 05:46:36 PM PDT

[ Parent ]

....

poor job communicating on my part (none / 0)

the topics listed above are not really the topics as presented, and we should have listed "women's issues" so there would be no misunderstanding. In fact, looking back on this, that was really a dumb mistake.

When I mean not putting in a box, I mean, there will be no panel on, for example, "labor" but labor will be a theme addressed throughout. Same with women's issues.

We'll have sessions labeled "American Dream: A progress report" and "Framing Controversial Issues" and "Workplace Issues" and others.

So what I'm saying is that there will be no panel on women's issues because we intend to spread the exposure around, but women's issues will be addressed by women.

The same is true for religion and minority issues etc.

Again, I really really appreciate this discussion. You have helped me understand where the misperception lies. Thank you.

YearlyKos

by gina on Fri Jan 06, 2006 at 10:55:46 PM PDT

[ Parent ]

So you basically blew off any attempts on putting women on the agenda... I guess it doesn't matter that only 60 of the Democratic base is Women or that ABORTION is the single ISSUE facing WOMEN that can drastically change their future... oh that would be considered PURISTS by your masters.

There is a good post on MLW by on how new racism is deployed in anti-racist drag... this tosh from Gina is the feminist equivalent...

postdated's picture
Posted by postdated (not verified) on 9 March 2006 - 1:23pm
thanks for that

n/t

bayprairie's picture
Posted by bayprairie on 9 March 2006 - 1:50pm
thanks for telling folks about us

Thanks for the post, media girl!

YearlyKos will not only be a fun event, it will set up connections, between anyone and everyone, so that we can act more like an online machine, and less like a cardboard box full of random springs and cogs. YearlyKos will show that we can change the world, that we can take over the freaking place and put "on notice" the "leaders" who would take away our rights and seem to be doing everything they can to make our lives miserable. The task of taking our country back is daunting. YearlyKos will help us find our hope and recharge our enthusiasm for the long road ahead.

gina's picture
Posted by gina (not verified) on 9 March 2006 - 11:11am
oops

forgot to add...the part about planned parent hood...would love for them to join the conversation at yearlykos. Yeah, they walk the walk.

gina's picture
Posted by gina (not verified) on 9 March 2006 - 11:13am
W00t
YearlyKos will show that we can change the world, that we can take over the freaking place and put "on notice" the "leaders" who would take away our rights and seem to be doing everything they can to make our lives miserable.

Would that be before or after Anti-Choice Harry Reid gives the keynote speech....? Or perhaps as the blog boys make another pitch for Casey, Taylor, Massa, Ritter while bashing yet again NARAL?

postdated's picture
Posted by postdated (not verified) on 9 March 2006 - 1:31pm
sigh

as usual...reaching out rejected. I'm still open, but if you're not, well, at least I tried.

Onward. To the next stop. Maybe they will be interested in helping us address this important issue.

Peace, outta here.

-gina

gina's picture
Posted by gina (not verified) on 9 March 2006 - 2:59pm
Double sigh

I was not aware of the exchange postdated quoted in the comment above. It seems that you rejected the outreach from others, and that women's equality not being on the agenda is a deliberate choice on your part. Whether that was your unilateral decision or the decision of the Patron for whom the conference is named, it's quite clear where you stand.

The result? You marginalize yourselves and alienate yourselves from the progressive roots.

How typical to try to chalk it up as our problem. That's a great rhetorical ploy. I bet lots of women fall for it. And if not, I'm sure it reassures plenty of dudes.

media girl's picture
Posted by media girl on 9 March 2006 - 3:58pm
during the early planning stages of ykos

I read numerous responses made by Gina to queries on a women's issues forum that she was tired of women's issues -- that women's issues should be part of a 'general chorus of voices'. No problem focusing specifically on these issues when it's time for a fundraising call, however.

dblhelix's picture
Posted by dblhelix (not verified) on 9 March 2006 - 4:43pm