Women's Right to Vote

Comments

8 comments posted
Gee, what do those states have in common?

http://www.adherents.com/largecom/com_sbc.html

The Largest Southern Baptist Communities

Miscellaneous Statistics:

The Southern Baptist Convention is the second largest religious body in the United States (Catholics are the largest).

The Southern Baptist Convention has more churches (over 37,000) in the United States than any other religious body - even more than the Catholic Church.

Over half of all Southern Baptists in the world live in five Southern states: Texas, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama.

The states with the highest proportion of Southern Baptists are Mississippi, Alabama, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Kentucky.

Wow, all of those states except Texas and Kentucky are green on that map. Go figure.

Morgaine-ism© #8

"A Woman's Sexual and Reproductive Autonomy is Sacred and Absolute."

Morgaine Swann's picture
Posted by Morgaine Swann on 5 March 2005 - 8:38pm
Did women support the 19th amendment

Did women support the 19th amendment in those states? As far as I can see the amendment was delayed from the time of the civil war because most women were against it.

Let me ask you this: do you think it would be right for the men of that time to enact a constitutional amendment about women that was opposed by the majority of women?

DavidByron's picture
Posted by DavidByron on 5 March 2005 - 9:46pm
Constitutional History 101

The Bill of Rights exists to protect the Rights of the Individual and/or Minority from the Tyranny of the Majority.

Morgaine-ism© #8

"A Woman's Sexual and Reproductive Autonomy is Sacred and Absolute."

Morgaine Swann's picture
Posted by Morgaine Swann on 5 March 2005 - 10:23pm
I agree

The men were basically pussy-whipped and should have given women the vote whether they wanted it or not immidiately after the Australian ballot was introduced (uh... 1880's ??) and the argument about dependents not voting was removed, or along with the blacks - as if they had a genuinely independent vote - whichever came first. [Sorry - I didn't mean to imply I don't know which came first]

DavidByron's picture
Posted by DavidByron on 6 March 2005 - 12:09am
Interesting concept

Can you cite the source of this research?

Matsu's picture
Posted by Matsu on 6 March 2005 - 4:46am
Look it's years since I looke

Look it's years since I looked into any of this. For some reason the website I kept some notes on is still hanging around although the navigation looks bust and maybe the old links have failed - you know how old web sites get.

The first quote is of an account of the 1848 Seneca Falls "birth of feminism" meeting. These women were all for women's rights but they hadn't even thought to put the vote among them and when asked about it almost 50% including the senior co-host of the convention voted against it.

There's some good stuff there and at the time all the links worked but who knows by now. However I did try to quote large enough chuncks to get the context and you ought to be able to re-Google the rest of it if URLs are broken.

Some quotes come from books which I just quote the book and page. Here's a bibliography which is even older but might help find the books by giving their author and date of publication. Robert Edgar Riegel was born in 1902 I think so his account was especially interesting.

Since writing that I did come across some figures for Maine around the time of the amendment suggesting that more women still opposed the vote than favoured it although most were indifferent. However as I'm sure you know they didn't go in for polling back then so it's unusual to find anything statistical and I don't know where the heck that source is now.

I'd be interest to hear about anything you have to say which would suggest the counter-hypothesis that the majority of women favoured giving women the vote. Certainly the numbers shifted from 1848 (when even feminists barely endorsed the vote) to 1920. Towards the end there it seems that the feminists' association with prohibition hurt their chances of an amendment because breweries opposed women's vote - they bought into the then very common beleif that women were more moral than men (something feminists have clung to since), and feared women's vote would mean prohibition. Once prohibition came into being anyway women's vote followed almost immidiately. That probably cost women 10 years without the vote and put America behind a bunch of other countries.

DavidByron's picture
Posted by DavidByron on 6 March 2005 - 2:00pm
Progressive Legislation

As I recall, there was a lot of social reform in that era. Many men were away at war and women learned to get on without them. There were new amendments such as a graduate income tax, direct election of senators, the women's right to vote, and yes, prohibition. It was a time of trade union organization and trust busting (slightly earlier) and social reform movements.

Not only in the United States, but in the UK, there was a push for women's right to vote and interestingly, it was the men who voted to let women vote, in most cases, as in many places women could not vote to get the right to vote.

I do agree that not everyone wants freedom or rights, but that is usually results in apathy. Today's elections are proof enough. There were those who predict all kinds of bad outcomes if women got the right to vote, but it was my impression this was more a fear among men than women.

Speaking of film, I will never forget the scene in "Norma Rae" where she holds up the sign that says "Union." One by one the workers shut their machines off until there is only one machine left running - the woman who fear to be against the patriarchy and so her machine runs and runs. Finally she shuts it off, looks around and seeing she is not alone, she weeps.

Sometimes the ones who are against something are just afraid.

Finally, her vote counted.

Matsu's picture
Posted by Matsu on 6 March 2005 - 2:14pm
Did you read that link?

When you ask for data in future should I just ignore it or did you actually read that link? From what you wrote it sounds like you didn't biut maybe you have a queer sense of humour.

it was the men who voted to let women vote, in most cases, as in many places women could not vote to get the right to vote.

Is that some kind of joke?

It reminds me of something I've written and might have been on that page even. I've heard so often from feminists that women "won" the right to vote as if they held a bloody revolution or something. They hate the idea of admiting -- duh -- the only reason they got the vote is that men voted for it.

The sex war mentality -- men are evil scum --is so intense they can't accept the obvious point that women could hardly have voted for themselves to get the vote.

Sure World War 1 tipped the scales for many in America as it did in the UK but I think any time from about 1870 onwards women could have had the vote if anyone had really been all that fussed about it. The fact is most of the stuff feminists wanted coincided with a conservative status quo outlook. Conservatism and feminism are two sides of the same coin in many respects. But not on voting.

DavidByron's picture
Posted by DavidByron on 6 March 2005 - 3:38pm